The Asian Short-clawed Otter (Aonyx cinerea) has shorter claws which differentiates it from other otters. It also has a small head, short legs and a flattened tail, which makes it more streamlined when swimming.

Behaviour: The Asian Short-clawed Otter is a sociable animal and can live in groups of up to 12 individuals. Within each group there is a monogamous pair, with both parents contributing to the raising of the offspring. A female otter is pregnant for around 62 days and can have up to 7 young at one time. The otters communicate with each other using a vocabulary of at least 12 calls, which include greeting, mating and alarm calls.

Diet

Asian Short-clawed Otters are omnivorous and will feed on crabs, molluscs, fish, snakes, small birds and mammals in the wild. In captivity, they get a varied diet of meat, fruit and vegetables.

Habitat

Asia.

Greetings

The otters communicate with each other using a vocabulary of at least 12 calls, which include greeting, mating and alarm calls.

Offspring

A female otter is pregnant for around 62 days and can have up to 7 young at one time.

Make a one-off donation

Hello everyone. We need your help and support now more than ever. The pandemic has been tough and whilst we hope to be out of lockdown soon we are facing a huge shortfall.

More of our animals you may like to meet

Park News

Vouchers and promotions

Vouchers and promotions

If you have any vouchers like these, please do use them by 31st October, after which point they will expire. We have honoured all historic vouchers this year, but we will now start afresh from...

read more
Celebrating zookeepers

Celebrating zookeepers

Happy International Zookeeper Day to our dedicated team, who go the extra mile for our animals every day. Thank you for everything you do!

read more
Halloween spooktacular

Halloween spooktacular

We are well known for our annual Halloween event and this year promises even more spooky fun across the October half term. The narrow gauge railway will be transformed into a ghost train. Visitors...

read more